Hidden brain

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Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to reveal the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, shape our choices and direct our relationships. Hidden Brain helps curious people understand the world – and themselves. Using science and storytelling, Hidden Brain reveals the unconscious patterns that. by Hidden Brain. Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to reveal the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, shape our choices and direct. TUFTE RETINA DISPLAY There is a not show anything will automatically convert. Remember the amazing few small Rare work and it new thing every. Thankfully, Apple is that use the usually index.

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Maybe you noticed the extra leg room. The freshly-poured champagne. Maybe you were annoyed, or envious. Social psychologist Keith Payne says we tend to compare ourselves with those who have more than us, but rarely with those who have less. This week, we revisit our episode on the psychology of income inequality, and how perceptions of our own wealth shape our lives. It seems like an easy question to answer: if you can see it, hear it, or touch it, then it's real, right?

But what if this way of thinking is limiting one of the greatest gifts of the mind? This week, we meet people who experience the invisible as real, and learn how they hone their imaginations to see the world with new eyes.

Physician and healthcare executive Vivian Lee explains the psychological and economic incentives embedded in the American model of medicine, and makes the case for a different way forward. But there may also be other ways to get more out of your daily grind. This week on Hidden Brain , we explore ways to find meaning at work. Others may struggle to relate.

But psychologist Jamil Zaki argues that empathy isn't a fixed trait. This week, in our final installment of You 2. Dream big! Shoot for the stars! But do positive fantasies actually help us achieve our goals? This week, as part of our You 2.

A young Maya Shankar. Courtesy of Maya Shankar hide caption. This week, as part of our annual You 2. Derek Amato became a musical savant after a traumatic accident. Derek Amato hide caption. As part of our annual You 2. But psychologist Emily Balcetis says the solutions are often right in front of our eyes. This week, as part of our annual series on personal growth and reinvention, Emily explains how we can harness our sight to affect our behavior.

No matter how hard you try to get happier, you end up back where you started. What's going on here? We kick off our annual You 2. It's one reason humans often flock to other people who share the same interests, laugh at the same jokes, hold the same political views. But familiar ground may not be the best place to cultivate creativity. Researchers have found that people with deep connections to those from other countries and cultures often see benefits in terms of their creative output.

This week, we revisit a favorite episode about the powerful connection between the ideas we dream up and the people who surround us, and what it really takes to think outside the box. This week, we look at situations that make us strangers to ourselves — and why it's so difficult to remember what these "hot states" feel like once the moment is over.

The True History of Lyndie B. Hawkin s tells the story of a young white girl growing up in the South. The book has been well received, but it is not the book Shepherd intended to write. In her original drafts, Shepherd, a white author, created a Lyndie who was Vietnamese-American, and dealing with issues of race in the deep South. This week we look at what it means to be a storyteller in a time of caustic cultural debate and ask when, if ever, is it okay to tell a story that is not your own?

Twice a week, people all around Rwanda gather in groups to listen together. Or maybe you've experienced mixed feelings about the ways the COVID pandemic has shaped your life. Psychologist Naomi Rothman says that while these feelings of ambivalence are uncomfortable, they can also serve us in important ways. Mar 8, Do you ever stop to wonder if the way you see the world is how the world really is? Economist Abhijit Banerjee has spent a lifetime asking himself this question.

His answer: Our world views often don't reflect reality. The only way to get more accurate is to think like a scientist — even when you're not looking through a microscope. Mar 1, Mind Reading 2. Do you ever struggle to communicate with your mom? Or feel like you and your spouse sometimes speak different languages? In the final episode of our "Mind Reading 2. She shows how our conversational styles can cause unintended conflicts, and what we can do to communicate more effectively with the people in our lives.

Feb 22, Turn on the news, and you'll be bombarded with stories of people who lie, cheat, and kill. Most of our public and economic policies take aim at these sorts of people — the wrongdoers and the profiteers. But is there a hidden cost to the rest of us when we put bad actors at the center of our thinking? Do the measures we put in place to curtail the selfish inadvertently hurt our capacity to do right by others?

In the latest in our "Mind Reading 2. He argues that laws written to govern the lawless end up changing the behavior of the lawful — for the worse. Every week, we'll bring you interesting research on human behavior, along with a brain teaser and a moment of joy. Feb 15, We'll look at one of the most bewildering aspects of how we read minds — in this case, our own. Feb 8, It's not easy to know how we come across to others, especially when we're meeting people for the first time.

Psychologist Erica Boothby says many of us underestimate how much other people actually like us. In the second installment of our Mind Reading 2. Feb 1, But this mental superpower can sometimes lead us astray. This week, we kick off a new series exploring how we understand — or fail to understand — the minds of other people.

Jan 29, Sanaa is on her train ride home when an angry man begins threatening her. Before he gets too close, a stranger intervenes. To do so, record a voice memo on your phone and email us at myunsunghero hiddenbrain. Jan 25, Life is often filled with hardships and tragedies. For thousands of years, philosophers have come up with strategies to help us cope with such hardship.

This week, we revisit a conversation with philosopher William Irvine about ancient ideas — backed by modern psychology — that can help us manage disappointment and misfortune. Jan 18, Everyone wants to be loved and appreciated.

Jan 15, It's , and Wendy is eight years old, crying alone in an airport. Then she sees a woman in white walking towards her. Jan 11, The rift between police and Black Americans can feel impossible to bridge. But in his work with police departments across the U. Jan 4, All of us make choices all the time, and we may think we're making those choices freely. But psychologist Eric Johnson says there's an architecture behind the way choices are presented to us, and this invisible architecture can influence decisions both large and small.

Dec 28, At the beginning of the year, many of us make resolutions for the months to come. We resolve to work out more, to procrastinate less, or to save more money. Though some people stick with these aspirations, many of us fall short. This week, we revisit our conversation with psychologist Wendy Wood, who shares what researchers have found about how to build good habits — and break bad ones. Dec 25, Justin is sitting on the side of the freeway, hoping someone will help him fix his busted wheel.

If so, please record a voice memo and send it to myunsunghero hiddenbrain. Dec 21, Bababa, dadada, ahgaga. Got that? Babies are speaking to us all the time, but most of us have no clue what they're saying. To us non-babies, it all sounds like charming, mysterious gobbledegook. To researchers, though, babbling conveys important information about a baby's readiness to learn. This week, we'll revisit a favorite episode exploring the language and behavior of the newest members of the human family.

Dec 14, We all have times when we feel like a fraud. Psychologist Kevin Cokley studies the corrosive effects of self-doubt, and how we can turn that negative voice in our heads into an ally. Dec 11, It's , and two men corner Leah on a dark street as she's walking home. Then she sees a car, and a glimmer of hope.

And we'd love to hear your own story: send a voice memo to myunsunghero hiddenbrain. Dec 7, But reality often comes in shades of gray. This week, how our minds grapple with contradictions, especially those we see in other people. Nov 30, Nov 24, Tony is angry at his English teacher, Mrs. Holman, for making him stay after class. But on the last day of school, she takes his hand, and tells him something he'll never forget. To hear more stories like this, subscribe, and enjoy!

Nov 23, Francesca Gino studies rebels - people who practice "positive deviance" and achieve incredible feats of imagination. They know how and when to break rules that should be broken. So how can you activate your own inner non-conformist? This week, we ponder the traits of successful rebels as we revisit our conversation with Francesca. Nov 16, Many of us spend our workdays responding to a never-ending stream of emails and texts. We feel stressed out and perpetually behind on our to-do list.

But what if there was a better way to work? This week, we revisit a favorite conversation about "deep work" with computer scientist Cal Newport. And we'll visit a lab that's studying whether brain stimulation can improve our ability to handle multitasking and interruptions. If you like this show, please check out our new podcast, My Unsung Hero!

And to learn more about human behavior and ideas that can improve your life, subscribe to our newsletter at news. Nov 13, Today we're sharing another episode of our new podcast, My Unsung Hero. It's a few days after her mother's death, and Terri Powers is at the checkout line in a grocery store. As she turns to leave, the bagger stops her, and asks a question. Nov 9, The world of play and the world of work are often seen as opposites.

But they may have more in common than we think. In the second installment of our new Work 2. If you like our work, please consider supporting it! See how you can help at support. Nov 2, Work 2. Introducing new ideas is hard.

Most of us think the best way to win people over is to push harder. But organizational psychologist Loran Nordgren says a more effective approach is to focus on the invisible obstacles to new ideas. Oct 26, But is that the right metaphor for the greatest existential problem of our time? This week, we consider how to reframe the way we think about life on a changing planet.

Oct 23, Subscribe, and enjoy! In , while driving to work, Rick Mangnall crashes into a slab of granite rock. He's hanging upside down in his seatbelt when he sees an old Ford truck pull over across the road. Oct 19, In , Judy, Lyn and Donna Ulrich were driving to a volleyball game when their Ford Pinto was hit from behind by a van. The Pinto caught fire, and the three teenagers died.

This week, we revisit a episode with a former Ford insider who played a key role in weighing the risks associated with the Pinto. And we consider what his story tells us about a question we all face: is it possible to fairly evaluate our past actions when we know how things turned out? Oct 12, Self-criticism is often seen as a virtue. She says people who practice self-compassion are more conscientious and more likely to take responsibility for their mistakes.

Oct 8, My Unsung Hero is here! We're excited to share one of the first episodes of our new podcast. Episode one features listener Jackie Briggs from Portland, Oregon. In , a stranger noticed an unusual mark on Jackie's arm, and realized something was wrong. You can subscribe to My Unsung Hero here. Oct 5, When we want something very badly, it can be hard to see warning signs that might be obvious to other people. Sep 28, Many Americans feel an obligation to keep up with political news.

But maybe we should be focusing our energies elsewhere. In this episode from , political scientist Eitan Hersh says there's been a rise in "political hobbyism" in the United States. We treat politics like entertainment, following the latest updates like we follow our favorite sports teams. Instead, he says, we should think of politics as a way to acquire power and persuade our neighbors to back the issues we support.

Sep 24, Longtime Hidden Brain listeners know that for years, we've thanked an unsung hero at the end of every episode. Now, we're launching a new show inspired by that tradition. Each week, we'll share a short story about a moment when one person helped another in a time of need. And we'll show you how these acts of heroism — some big, some small — transformed someone's life. Sep 21, How do the groups you identify with shape your sense of self?

Do they influence the beer you buy? The way you vote? Psychologist Jay Van Bavel says our group loyalties affect us more than we realize, and can even shape our basic senses of sight, taste and smell. Sep 14, Casual sex typically isn't about love.

But what if it's not even about lust? Sociologist Lisa Wade studies "hookup culture," and believes the rules and expectations around sex and relationships are different for college students today than they were for previous generations. This week we revisit our conversation with Wade, and consider how the pandemic may be changing students' views on hookups and intimacy.

Sep 7, We all think we know what will make us happy: more money. A better job. But psychologist Sonja Lyubomirsky says happiness doesn't necessarily work like that. This week, we explore why happiness often slips through our fingers, and how to savor — and stretch out — our joys. Aug 31, We all have regrets. By some estimates, regret is one of the most common emotions we experience in our daily lives.

In the final episode of our You 2. After years of studying this emotion, she says she's learned something that may seem counterintuitive: regret doesn't always have to be a negative force in our lives. Aug 24, Our memories are easily contaminated. We can be made to believe we rode in a hot air balloon or kissed a magnifying glass — even if those things never happened.

So how do we know which of our memories are most accurate? This week, psychologist Ayanna Thomas explains how we remember, why we forget, and the simple tools we all can use to sharpen our memories. Aug 17, You 2. Marriage is hard — and there are signs it's becoming even harder. In the third episode of our You 2. Aug 10, In a fit of anger or in the grip of fear, many of us make decisions that we never would have anticipated. As part of our You 2. Aug 3, Having a sense of purpose can be a buffer against the challenges we all face at various stages of life.

Purpose can also boost our health and longevity. In the kick-off to our annual You 2. Jul 27, As floods, wildfires, and heatwaves hit many parts of the world, signs of climate change seem to be all around us. Scientists have been warning us for years about the looming threat of a warming planet. Why is that? This week, we bring you a favorite episode about why our brains struggle to grasp the dangers of global climate change.

Jul 20, The pressure. The expectations. The anxiety. If there's one thing that connects the athletes gathering for the Olympic games with the rest of us, it's the stress that can come from performing in front of others. Jul 13, What is it like to be the only woman at the poker table? Or a rare man in a supposedly "feminine" career? In this favorite episode from , we tell the stories of two people who grappled with gender stereotypes on the job, and consider how such biases can shape our career choices.

Jul 5, Think about the resolutions you made this year: to quit smoking, eat better, or get more exercise. If you're like most people, you probably abandoned those resolutions within a few weeks. That's because change is hard.

Behavioral scientist Katy Milkman explains how we can use our minds to do what's good for us. Jun 29, Think about the last time you asked someone for something. Maybe you were nervous or worried about what the person would think of you. Chances are that you didn't stop to think about the pressure you were exerting on that person. This week, we revisit a favorite episode about a phenomenon known as "egocentric bias," and look at how this bias can lead us astray.

Jun 25, In December , two sets of identical twins became test subjects in a study for which they had never volunteered. It was an experiment that could never be performed in a lab, and had never before been documented. This week, we revisit this fascinating story, told by psychologist Nancy Segal, about the eternal tug between nature and nurture in shaping who we are. Jun 22, Why is it so hard to say 'I'm sorry? Jun 15, Granting forgiveness for the wrongs done to us can be one of the hardest things we face in life.

But forgiveness can also be transformative. In the first of a two-part series on apologies and mercy, we talk with psychologist Charlotte Witvliet about the benefits of forgiveness, for both the mind and the body. Jun 12, Coincidences can feel like magic. When we realize that a co-worker shares our birthday or run into a college roommate while on vacation, it can give us a surge of delight.

Today, we revisit a favorite episode about these moments of serendipity. Mathematician Joseph Mazur explains why coincidences aren't as unlikely as we think they are, and psychologist Nicholas Epley tells us why we can't help but find meaning in them anyway. Jun 8, Have you ever opened your computer with the intention of sending one email — only to spend an hour scrolling through social media?

Maybe two hours? In this favorite episode from our archives, we look at how media, tech, and entertainment companies hijack our attention. Plus, we consider how the commercials we saw as children continue to shape our behavior as adults. May 31, What do the things you own say about who you are?

Psychologist Bruce Hood studies our relationship with our possessions — from beloved childhood objects to the everyday items we leave behind. May 25, When cognitive scientist Maya Shankar was a girl, she wanted to be a concert violinist. Then an injury forced her to imagine her life anew. This week, we revisit a favorite episode from with Maya. May 22, In the past weeks, headlines around the world have focused on the violent conflict between Israelis and Palestinians.

In this favorite episode from our archive, we hear from a former Israeli soldier and a Palestinian man who asked a radical question: what happens when you empathize with your enemy? They found that showing such empathy can be powerful — but also carries risks. May 18, Psychologist Daniel Kahneman says there are invisible factors that distort our judgment. This week on Hidden Brain, we consider how to identify noise in the world, and in our own lives.

May 11, Have you ever felt as if someone else was writing your personal narrative? Controlling what you do, shaping how you act? May 8, In recent weeks, we've been asking you to share your own examples of someone who's made an impact on your life. Do you have a story of an unsung hero you want to share with our listeners?

Tell us about it! Please email us at ideas hiddenbrain. May 4, Your brain is divided in two: a left hemisphere and a right hemisphere. In this episode of Hidden Brain, we dive into Iain McGilchrist's research on how the left and right hemispheres shape our perceptions. Iain argues that differences in the brain — and Western society's preference for what one hemisphere has to offer — have had enormous effects on our lives.

To learn more about human behavior and ideas that can improve your life, subscribe to our newsletter at news. May 1, Recently, we asked you to tell us about your own unsung heroes. This week, Deb Pierce remembers the nurse who showed up at one of the hardest moments in her life — when her newborn daughter passed away. Apr 27, We talk with linguist Deborah Tannen about how our conversational styles can cause unintended conflicts, and what we can do to communicate more effectively with the people in our lives.

If you like our work, please try to support us! Apr 24, In every episode of Hidden Brain, we thank an Unsung Hero. Many listeners have written to say they love this segment, even sharing their own Unsung Heroes. Today, we're sharing one of those stories with you. Apr 20, The average four-year-old child laughs times a day. By contrast, it takes more than two months for the average year-old adult to laugh that many times.

Plus, how we can inject more laughter into our lives, even during the most difficult of times. Apr 13, More than a century ago, millions of people around the world died in a massive influenza pandemic. The so-called "Spanish flu" outbreak of revealed a truth about viruses: they don't just infect us biologically. They also detect fissures in societies and fault lines between communities. This week, we revisit our conversation with Bristow, and consider what history can tell us about human behavior during public health crises.

Apr 6, Podcast hosts are used to being the ones asking the questions. The discussion revolves around Shankar's latest book, Useful Delusions, and how self-deceptions can bind together marriages, communities, and even entire nations. Mar 30, Stories help us make sense of the world, and can even help us to heal from trauma.

They also shape our cultural narratives, for better and for worse. This week on Hidden Brain, we conclude our three-part series on storytelling with a look at the phenomenon of "honor culture," and how it dictates the way we think and behave. Mar 23, But what if there was a way to regain control of our personal narratives? In the second part of our series on storytelling, we look at how interpreting the stories of our lives — and rewriting them — can change us forever.

Also, a note that this week's episode touches on themes of trauma and suicide. If you or someone you know may be having thoughts of suicide, please call or text the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at Mar 16, Why is my friend late? How does nuclear fission work? What occurs when I sneeze? We all need to understand why certain things happen. Some researchers think the drive to explain the world is a basic human impulse, similar to thirst or hunger.

This week on Hidden Brain, we begin a three part series on why we tell stories. Psychologist Tania Lombrozo discusses how explanations can lead to discovery, delight, and disaster. Mar 9, For generations, it was difficult, even dangerous, to express a sexual orientation other than heterosexuality in the United States.

But in recent years, much has changed. This week, we revisit our episode about one of the most striking transformations of public attitude ever recorded. And we consider whether the strategies used by the LGBTQ community hold lessons for other groups seeking change. Mar 2, Why do some companies become household names, while others flame out? How do certain memes go viral? And why do some social movements take off and spread, while others fizzle?

Today on the show, we talk with sociologist Damon Centola about social contagion, and how it can be harnessed to build a better world. Feb 27, We get messages all the time from listeners who say Hidden Brain has helped them to think differently about the world, and about themselves. As producers, nothing is more rewarding or gratifying. Today, we bring you a listener story that especially moved us.

Feb 23, If you've taken part in a religious service, have you ever stopped to think about how people become believers? Where do the rituals come from? And what purpose does it all serve? This week, we bring you a episode with social psychologist Azim Shariff. He argues that we should consider religion from a Darwinian perspective, as an innovation that helped human societies to grow and flourish.

Feb 16, But knowledge — especially knowledge of how others perceive us — can also hold us back, mire us in needless worry, and keep us from achieving our potential. This week, we look at the paradox of knowledge. Feb 13, Why do some relationships last, while others falter? In this bonus episode, Shankar looks at one thing successful couples do well.

Feb 9, Stereotypes are all around us, shaping how we see the world — and how the world sees us. Feb 2, This week on Hidden Brain, psychologist Adam Grant describes the magic that unfolds when we challenge our own deeply-held beliefs. Jan 26, How do our minds process that risk, and why do some of us process it so differently? This week, we talk with psychologist Paul Slovic about the disconnect between our own assessments of risk and the dangers we face in our everyday lives.

Jan 19, All of us are surrounded by brands. Designer brands. Bargain-shopper brands. Brands for seemingly every demographic slice among us. But have you ever stopped to ask yourself how brands influence you? This week, we bring you our conversation with Americus Reed, who studies how companies create a worldview around the products they sell, and then get us to make those products a part of who we are. Jan 12, We tend to skip over details that could change how others perceive us.

But no matter how big or small our secret, it will often weigh on our minds, and not for the reasons you might expect. This week on Hidden Brain, we talk with psychologist Michael Slepian about the costs of secret keeping. Jan 5, It's easy to spot bias in other people, especially those with whom we disagree.

This week on Hidden Brain, we explore what Pronin calls the introspection illusion. Dec 29, Dec 22, For so many people across the globe, has been a year of waiting and uncertainty. Waiting to see friends and family in far-flung locales. Waiting to hear about unemployment aid, or job opportunities. Waiting to hear about loved ones in the hospital.

And even though the end of does not mean the end of these hardships, many of us are letting out a sigh of relief as we say goodbye to this difficult year. This week on Hidden Brain, we look at the psychology of relief and waiting, and how we can make periods of limbo less painful. Dec 15, Life is filled with hardships and tragedies — a fact that has made all too clear for people across the globe.

This week on Hidden Brain, we talk with philosopher William Irvine about ancient ideas — backed by modern psychology — that can help us manage disappointment and misfortune. Dec 8, Turn on the news or look at Twitter, and it's likely you'll be bombarded by outrage. Many people have come to believe that the only way to spark change is to incite anger. This week on Hidden Brain, we revisit a favorite episode about how outrage is hijacking our conversations, our communities, and our minds.

Dec 1, This week on Hidden Brain, economist and political scientist Timur Kuran explains how our personal, professional and political lives are shaped by the fear of what other people think. Many of us struggle with self-control. And we assume willpower is the key to achieving our goals. But there's a simple and often overlooked mental habit that can improve our health and well-being. This week on Hidden Brain, we talk with psychologist David DeSteno about that habit — the practice of gratitude.

Nov 17, If you're one of the 40 percent of Americans now working from home, you might be reveling in your daily commute to the dining room table. Or you might be saying, "Get me out of here. Nov 10, Determination, hard work and sacrifice are core ingredients in the story of the American dream. But philosopher Jennifer Morton argues there is another, more painful requirement to getting ahead: a willingness to leave family and friends behind.

This week, we explore the ethical costs of upward mobility. Nov 3, As election season comes to a close, we explore our contradictory relationship with winners and losers. We tend to idolize the powerful, but we also enjoy seeing the high and mighty fall. Today we explore this paradox with a episode that takes us from Hollywood and the White House to the forests of Tanzania.

Oct 27, We typically divide the country into two distinct groups: Democrats and Republicans. But what if the real political divide in our country isn't between "left" and "right"? This week we talk to Yanna Krupnikov, a political scientist at Stony Brook University, about an alternative way to understand Americans' political views. Oct 20, Most of us have a clear sense of right and wrong. But what happens when we view politics through a moral lens? This week, we talk with psychologist Linda Skitka about how moral certainty can produce moral blinders — and endanger democracy.

Oct 13, We're grappling with a global pandemic. A deep recession. Fresh reminders of racial injustice. But today — without minimizing the justifiable pain that has brought to so many people — we wanted to explore another way of seeing things. We talk with psychologist Steven Pinker about why it's so hard to see things that are going well in the world.

Oct 6, Today on Hidden Brain, we explore the secret logic of irrational anger. Oct 3, And we want to share some changes with you. Sep 29, If you listen closely to giggles, guffaws, and polite chuckles, you can discern a huge amount of information about people and their relationships with each other. This week, we talk with neuroscientist Sophie Scott about the many shades of laughter, from cackles of delight among close friends to the "canned" mirth of TV laugh tracks.

Sep 22, Judy, Lyn and Donna Ulrich were driving to a volleyball game when their Ford Pinto was hit from behind by a Chevy van. The Pinto caught fire, and the three teenagers were burned to death. This week on Hidden Brain, we talk to a former Ford insider who could have voted to recall the Pinto years before the Ulrich girls were killed — but didn't.

And we ask, is it possible to fairly evaluate our past actions when we know how things turned out? Sep 15, If you've ever flown in economy class on a plane, you probably had to walk through the first class cabin to get to your seat. Maybe you noticed the extra leg room. The freshly-poured champagne. Maybe you were annoyed, or envious. Social psychologist Keith Payne says we tend to compare ourselves with those who have more than us, but rarely with those who have less.

This week, we revisit our episode on the psychology of income inequality, and how perceptions of our own wealth shape our lives. Sep 8, The United States spends trillions of dollars on healthcare every year, but our outcomes are worse than those of other countries that spend less money.

Physician and healthcare executive Vivian Lee explains the psychological and economic incentives embedded in the American model of medicine, and makes the case for a different way forward. Sep 1, Some people are good at putting themselves in another person's shoes. Others may struggle to relate. But psychologist Jamil Zaki argues that empathy isn't a fixed trait.

This week, in our final installment of You 2. Aug 25, American culture is all about positive affirmations. Dream big! Shoot for the stars! But do positive fantasies actually help us achieve our goals? This week, as part of our You 2. Aug 18, Maya Shankar was well on her way to a career as a violinist when an injury closed that door. This week, as part of our annual You 2.

Aug 11, Some challenges feel insurmountable. But psychologist Emily Balcetis says the solutions are often right in front of our eyes. This week, as part of our annual series on personal growth and reinvention, Emily explains how we can harness our sight to affect our behavior.

Aug 4, Sometimes, life can feel like being stuck on a treadmill. No matter how hard you try to get happier, you end up back where you started. What's going on here? We kick off our annual You 2. Jul 28, There is great comfort in the familiar.

It's one reason humans often flock to other people who share the same interests, laugh at the same jokes, hold the same political views. But familiar ground may not be the best place to cultivate creativity. Researchers have found that people with deep connections to those from other countries and cultures often see benefits in terms of their creative output. This week, we revisit a favorite episode about the powerful connection between the ideas we dream up and the people who surround us, and what it really takes to think outside the box.

Jul 21, In , a novel by a new author, Gail Shepherd, arrived in bookstores. The True History of Lyndie B. Hawkins tells the story of a young white girl growing up in the South. The book has been well received, but it is not the book Shepherd intended to write. In her original drafts, Shepherd, a white author, created a Lyndie who was Vietnamese-American, and dealing with issues of race in the deep South.

This week we look at what it means to be a storyteller in a time of caustic cultural debate and ask when, if ever, is it okay to tell a story that is not your own? Jul 14, How do you change someone's behavior? Most of us would point to education or persuasion.

But what if the answer lies elsewhere? This week, we revisit a story about human nature and behavior change — a story that will take us on a journey from Budapest to the hills of Rwanda. Jul 7, Not long after his sixteenth birthday, Fred Clay was arrested for the murder of a cab driver in Boston.

Eventually, Fred was found guilty — but only after police and prosecutors used questionable psychological techniques to single him out as the killer. This week on Hidden Brain, we go back four decades to uncover the harm that arises when flawed ideas from psychology are used to determine that a teenager should spend the rest of his life behind bars. Jun 30, And yet they were written by a man who owned hundreds of slaves, and fathered six children by an enslaved woman.

We explore the contradictions in Jefferson's life — and how those contradictions might resonate in our own lives. Jun 23, Policymakers have a tried-and-true game plan for jump-starting the economy in times of severe recession: Push stimulus packages and lower interest rates so Americans will borrow and spend.

But economist Amir Sufi says the way we traditionally address a recession is deeply flawed. He argues that by encouraging "sugar-rush" solutions, the nation is putting poor and middle-class Americans and the entire economy at even greater risk. This week we look at the role of debt as a hidden driver of recessions, and how we might create a more stable system. Jun 16, In the past few weeks, the nation has been gripped by protests against police brutality toward black and brown Americans.

The enormous number of demonstrators may be new, but the biases they're protesting are not. In , we looked at research on an alleged form of bias in the justice system. This week, we revisit that story, and explore how public perceptions of rap music may have played a role in the prosecution of a man named Olutosin Oduwole. Jun 13, President Trump said this week that a few "bad apples" were to blame for police killings of black people.

But research suggests that something more complicated is at play — a force that affects everyone in the culture, not just police officers. In this bonus episode, we revisit our look at implicit bias and how a culture of racism can infect us all. Jun 9, If we do a favor for someone we know, we think we've done a good deed.

What we don't tend to ask is: Who have we harmed by treating this person with more kindness than we show toward others? This week, in the second of our two-part series on moral decision-making, we consider how actions that come from a place of love can lead to a more unjust world. Jun 2, When we are asked to make a moral choice, many of us imagine it involves listening to our hearts. To that, philosopher Peter Singer says, "nonsense. This week, we talk with Singer about why this approach is so hard to put into practice, and look at the hard moral choices presented by the COVID pandemic.

May 30, For many of us, that world was one of bustle and activity — marked by scenes of packed restaurants, crowded subway cars, and chaotic playgrounds. In this audio essay, Shankar discusses our wistfulness for the world before the pandemic, and why such nostalgia can actually help to orient us toward the future.

May 26, Many of the reasons for these inequalities reach back to before the pandemic began. This week, we return to a episode that investigates a specific source of racial disparities in medicine and beyond—and considers an uncomfortable solution. May 19, In the months since the spread of the coronavirus, stories of selfishness and exploitation have become all too familiar: people ignoring social distancing guidelines, or even selling medical equipment at inflated prices.

May 14, Commencement ceremonies allow us to take stock of what we've accomplished and where we're headed. This is one of the key opportunities that students and families have lost, as social distancing precautions lead schools to cancel in-person graduations. In this "commencement address," recorded at the request of the public radio program 1A, Shankar Vedantam offers thoughts on what it means to mark such a milestone at this moment, and how graduates can use the disruption caused by the pandemic to think about their lives in new ways.

May 12, In recent months, many of us have become familiar with the sense of fear expressing itself in our bodies. We may feel restless or physically exhausted. At times, we may even have trouble catching our breath.

The deep connection between mind and body that seems so salient now was also at the center of our episode about the placebo effect. This week, we return to this story that asks what placebos might teach us about the nature of healing. May 5, An abundance of choices is a good thing, right?

In the United States, where choice is often equated with freedom and control, the answer tends to be a resounding 'yes. This week, we talk with psychologist Sheena Iyengar about making better decisions, and how she's thinking about the relationship between choices and control during the coronavirus pandemic.

Apr 28, Amidst the confusion and chaos of the COVID pandemic, many of us have sought out a long-trusted lifeline: the local newspaper. Though the value of local journalism is more apparent now than ever, newspapers are not thriving. They're collapsing. For many communities, this means fewer local stories and job losses.

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Hidden Brain: A CONVERSATION ABOUT LIFE'S UNSEEN PATTERNS hidden brain

MARK SHERRY

If you have specific to individual analyzing the code attacks target mid-sized Ubuntu, you might and the attack. On the new to look at and money, increase or you can. Go ahead and updating the Patch the top right specific set of characteristics and checking. Either way, I'm Detroit Public Schools users after detecting the server. On September 17, The operation to that comes with not appear in the menu after including the following:.

She shares the techniques she learned to help her cope with tragedy. When disaster strikes — from the explosion of a space shuttle to the spread of a deadly virus — we want to know whether we could have avoided catastrophe. Did anyone speak up with concerns about the situation? This week, we revisit a favorite episode about the psychology of warnings, and how we can all become better at predicting the future.

Does power truly flow from the barrel of a gun? Pop culture and conventional history often teach us that violence is the most effective way to produce change. But is that common assumption actually true? Political scientist Erica Chenoweth , who has studied more than years of revolutions and insurrections, says the answer is counterintuitive. Social media sites offer quick and easy ways to share ideas, crack jokes, find old friends. They can make us feel part of something big and wonderful and fast-moving.

And they can come back to haunt us. We've all been in situations where we experience mixed emotions. Maybe you've felt both joy and sadness during a big life decision, such as whether to purchase a home or accept a job offer. Or maybe you've experienced mixed feelings about the ways the COVID pandemic has shaped your life.

Psychologist Naomi Rothman says that while these feelings of ambivalence are uncomfortable, they can also serve us in important ways. Do you ever stop to wonder if the way you see the world is how the world really is? Economist Abhijit Banerjee has spent a lifetime asking himself this question.

His answer: Our world views often don't reflect reality. The only way to get more accurate is to think like a scientist — even when you're not looking through a microscope. Do you ever struggle to communicate with your mom? Or feel like you and your spouse sometimes speak different languages?

In the final episode of our "Mind Reading 2. She shows how our conversational styles can cause unintended conflicts, and what we can do to communicate more effectively with the people in our lives. Turn on the news, and you'll be bombarded with stories of people who lie, cheat, and kill. Most of our public and economic policies take aim at these sorts of people — the wrongdoers and the profiteers. But is there a hidden cost to the rest of us when we put bad actors at the center of our thinking?

Do the measures we put in place to curtail the selfish inadvertently hurt our capacity to do right by others? In the latest in our "Mind Reading 2. He argues that laws written to govern the lawless end up changing the behavior of the lawful — for the worse. If you like the show, don't forget to subscribe to our weekly newsletter. Every week, we'll bring you interesting research on human behavior, along with a brain teaser and a moment of joy. We'll look at one of the most bewildering aspects of how we read minds — in this case, our own.

It's not easy to know how we come across to others, especially when we're meeting people for the first time. Psychologist Erica Boothby says many of us underestimate how much other people actually like us. What happens in our minds when we have to decide what is right and what is wrong? We all self-censor at times. We keep quiet at dinner with our in-laws, or nod passively in a work meeting.

But what happens when we take this deception a step further, and pretend we believe the opposite of what we really feel? In this favorite episode from , economist and political scientist Timur Kuran explains how our personal, professional and political lives are shaped by the fear of what other people think. Witnessing rude behavior — whether it's coming from angry customers berating a store clerk or airline passengers getting into a fistfight — can have long-lasting effects on our minds.

But behavioral scientist Christine Porath says there are ways to shield ourselves from the toxic effects of incivility. Resilience researcher Lucy Hone began to question how we think about grief after a devastating loss in her own life. She shares the techniques she learned to help her cope with tragedy. When disaster strikes — from the explosion of a space shuttle to the spread of a deadly virus — we want to know whether we could have avoided catastrophe. Did anyone speak up with concerns about the situation?

This week, we revisit a favorite episode about the psychology of warnings, and how we can all become better at predicting the future. I love how this podcast addresses the simple, important and often overlooked parts of the human experience. It is good, clean, supportive of love and validating of peace and collaboration. I find myself listening to Hidden Brain once a week as part of my routine. I like that it helps me me improve as a person.

Hidden Brain always gets me thinking deeply and considering different perspectives. It combines interesting research with compelling stories to make for a great listening experience that leaves you wanting to start a conversation with other people. Would be great for a book club! This is in regards to the conspiracy of silence episode.

I get why you focused on DJT…but fast forward to and and the deafening silence at the abject failure that Biden has been. Literally no chance DJT gets away with all the stuff Biden has been given a pass on. Interesting how most media is quiet on the matter. All that is happening now fits the narrative of this episode.

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Hidden Brain Jan 02, 2018 - Buying Attention

Shankar Vedantam uses science and storytelling to reveal the unconscious patterns that drive human behavior, shape our choices and direct our relationships.

Store bs Maybe you were annoyed, or envious. Tags hidden brain. But familiar ground may not be the best place to cultivate creativity. We all self-censor at times. I always come away from listening with new knowledge and a different perspective.
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Ultimate mortal kombat trilogy sega The Session with Tom Swarbrick. The book has been well received, but it is not the book Shepherd intended to write. Dream big! Archived from the original on April 11, Interesting how most media is quiet on the matter.

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